Last Night’s BAFTAs in 10 Easy Steps

Monday February 22nd 2010


If you were following our rapid-fire twiterring last night then the majority of this won’t be new to you. If not, here are the 10 ‘need-to-knows’ of last night’s British Academy Film Awards:

1

THE WINNERS
Amazingly enough, every single winner at this year’s BAFTA awards was fairly justified. I can’t remember the last time this could be said about an awards ceremony. Strangely enough, it was due to the normally-annoying British bias, which allowed Colin Firth, Carey Mulligan and Duncan Jones to succeed where they will inevitably fail at the Oscars.

2

THE SPEECHES
Unfortunately, the watch word was yet again ‘dull’ but Duncan Jones (pictured above as Harry from Harry and the Hendersons), Colin Firth and an unbelievably embarrassed-looking Kristen Stewart did help to raise the bar a little. As expected, Vanessa Redgrave got the coveted FOR THE LOVE OF HUMANITY, PLEASE STOP TALKING award.

3

ROSS
An early reliance on Avatar-based LOLs luckily gave way to a few good jokes later on. The audience definitely weren’t digging it though.

4

GEORGE LAMB
The biggest fuckface of the night was easy to spot. Proving yet again that BBC3 is run by a small but select group of toddlers, they handed their red carpet coverage over to Mr-I’m-Singlehandedly-Killing-6-Music himself, George Lamb. His questions ranged from the mundanely insulting to the insultingly mundane, and not once did he even feign interest at the responses. His continued ability to turn every interview into an opportunity to tell an anecdote about himself was also shockingly evident. Then again, it didn’t seem like any of the Red Carpet reporters were putting much effort in, as evidenced by this interesting document, courtesy of Holy Moly.

5

THE DELAY
The BBC need to realise that in the age of Twitter, it is no longer acceptable to broadcast an awards ceremony on a 2-hour time delay, especially when they don’t even have any ad breaks to contend with. By the time BBC1 got round to the major awards, they’d already been online for hours.

6

THE TECHNICAL AWARDS
One product of the time delay was that the BBC chose to edit down the technical awards, moving them to a short montage at the conclusion of the broadcast. Various movie bloggers who would probably consider themselves ‘filmmakers first, bloggers second’ *cough* Brendon Connelly at /Film *end cough* were up in arms about this, but personally I couldn’t be happier with the BBC’s decision. I’m not saying that great editors, FX teams and the like shouldn’t be rewarded, but you can’t argue with the fact that 95% of viewers have no interest in them. It’s the same reason why audiences don’t sit in reverential silence during end credits.

7

THE WRIGHT/REITMAN/BOAL CONSPIRACY
Our favourite mid-ceremony game was trying to spot the differences between Edgar Wright, Jason Reitman and Marc Boal. Uncanny…

8

THE FUTURE KING
Seeing Prince William joined on stage by her from Batman & Robin and the older version of Briony Tallis was a surreal experience. It was also announced that he’s going to be the next President of the Academy. So make of that what you will.

9

K-STEW
Even Bella herself was in disbelief that she could possibly have qualified as a ‘rising star’ (an inconsistency made clear in the use of a clip from 2002’s Panic Room in her introductory montage) and awkwardly rambled about the Twilight fanbase who had inevitably swung the vote. Tahar Rahim was a good sport, as ever. What a lovely chap.

10

THE BEST TWEET OF ALL TIME
(Guy Pearce had just walked on stage.)